A Trip To Town

 Wednesday March  Comments Off on A Trip To Town
Jan 182015
 

It was all very exciting.  Miss Wednesday isn’t allowed out very often but she does get to go up to London for important things like trade fairs, where she is strictly chaperoned by her niece, Miss Becca.  As she’s been very good of late, Miss Becca allowed her to travel all the way to the Business Design Centre on her own, rather than meeting her at Paddington to ensure she didn’t get lost or sidetracked.  That proved to be the first error of the day because Miss Wednesday managed to go to the wrong side of Paddington to get into the Underground, thus wasting a lot of time as she realised she had to walk all the way back to just past where she’d got off the Cornwall train.  When you’re as short as Miss Wednesday, that can take a while.  And then, what with the Northern line appearing to have been moved (what the…?!) and Miss Wednesday chatting to a very nice coffee seller whilst seeking directions for the Business Design Centre, time was getting on.

For those who don’t know it, the Business Design Centre is a beautiful building in Islington, which was originally the Royal Agricultural Hall, holding agricultural shows until 1938.  Nowadays it’s a conference and exhibition venue and very nice it is too.  Apart from the catering arrangements, which are rubbish.

Facade of the Business Design Centre

Business Design Centre facade

On this occasion, it was hosting the London Textile Fair and both Miss Wednesday and Miss Becca were very excited at the prospect.  Alas, it turned out to be a less than inspiring experience.  Miss Becca manages a sizeable fabric shop in a big town and is very good at, well, everything, but especially display and marketing.  She was horrified at the sight that met their eyes.  No stands in the main area, just a sea of small tables with rails of hanging samples next to them.  It was difficult to see what was being offered and, unless you knew which firm you were after and what they offered, nigh on impossible to locate anything.  To make matters worse, what is it with reps at trade shows?  They never, ever want to make eye contact, say “hello” or even acknowledge your presence!

Miss Wednesday was starting to get tired and teasy so Becca, knowing the signs, decided it was time for lunch.  Miss Wednesday is very fond of lunch.  Being short of time, they went to the restaurant next door to the BDC, which they thought was a safe bet for something decent if not inspiring.  It was an ASK Pizza and Pasta place, despite the fact that the entrance looked more like a hairdresser.  Service was interminably slow and when she did get her carbonara, Miss Wednesday started to wonder if, indeed, they had made a terrible error and it was actually a hair salon after all.  Ever had a carbonara with no bacon?  Nope.  Weird.  It turned out that staff were short on the ground and things weren’t going well for the delightful ones who were there, poor things.  Oh dear.

After eventually escaping from ‘restaurant hell’, the ladies returned to the BDC, determined to find something appropriate to Miss Wednesday’s needs.  They went upstairs, where there were some actual stands, one of which had a beautiful backdrop of designs.  “The Vintage Collection” it spouted proudly.  Miss Wednesday was enchanted by the designs, although slightly confused because they were all on paper.

“What fabrics do these come in?” Miss Becca enquired of a mere slip of a girl behind the table.  Mere Slip gave our ladies what can only be described as “A Look” and said, “They’re vintage”.  With an emphasis on the “vintage”.  Okay.  Miss Becca tried again, to meet with an even more disdainful look and manner and a repeated, “They’re vintage.  They’re on paper.”

Miss Wednesday was extremely unimpressed and said, “Yes, we can see that.  We’re after fabric.  Good day to you”, and both she and Miss Becca turned on their (well-shod) heels and stalked off.

How do these people make a living?!  Surely, if you’re in the business of selling something – anything – you make half an effort to engage with people showing interest in your products?  Don’t you?  Even Miss Wednesday, who is undoubtedly The Least User-Friendly Person In The Entire World – but now obviously has a rival – will answer well-meant but frequently stupid questions with proper information!  So, alas, although Susanna Sampson’s “The Vintage Collection” had the patterns of Miss Wednesday’s dreams, she wasn’t getting any of Miss Wednesday’s sizeable budget.  Which is a shame for everybody.

Miss Becca manoeuvred Miss Wednesday downstairs and back into The First Circle Of Hell, whereupon they drifted miserably through the sea of tables and people who wouldn’t even meet their eye.

Then Miss Becca let out a soft squeak.  The squeak that says, “Gotcha!”  What had she found?  Makower Fabrics, the maker of a fabric that Miss Wednesday had been shown last year by a friend and Petticoat Club member but which had been on sale in The Priciest Fabric Shop In The World (Truro Fabrics) and was therefore out of reach for her purposes.  But here it was in new colourways, accompanied by some other beautiful, beautiful designs and at trade prices.  Miss Wednesday was in heaven.  Well, almost.  They had to get the people behind the table to speak.  And, if those people did speak, there was always the chance that they had high minimum orders and would send Miss Wednesday away with short shrift and more disdainful looks.

Not a bit of it.  Danielle, the lady behind the table, was delightful from start to finish.  She said, “Hello” and smiled, which is always a good start.  When Miss Becca asked what their minimum order was, she smiled again and said, “One metre.”  Miss Wednesday said, “Goodness, I need a lot more than that!”  And business was done.

Sadly, there wasn’t really enough time for Miss Wednesday to get into her stride but she placed an order for 8 fabrics, 5 of which are turning up this week.  A telephone call on Friday afternoon from another delightful person at Makower, confirmed that the in stock fabrics were ready for despatch.  All simple, painless and, well, pleasurable.  If only all the people at the fair had been like that!  But they weren’t so there are undoubtedly a few who lost business.

Still, here are some of the designs that are on their way to the workshop…

Seashells in Peach.  This will be stunning with a peach petticoat!

Seashells in Peach. This will be stunning with a peach petticoat!

Fabric design of seashells in a pale blue colourway

Seashells in blue. Heaven.

Becca chose this one.  It's very eye-catching - and she's a cat person!

Becca chose this one. It’s very eye-catching – and she’s a cat person!

Fabric design of green and blush pears on a pale blue background.

Pears. Good enough to eat and the picture doesn’t do it justice.

Fabric design of line-drawn Edwardian ladies in a blue, pink, grey and green colourway.

Edwardian ladies. This is extremely striking.

Beautiful, huh?  And a little different from Miss Wednesday’s previous offerings.  She’s very excited.

Sadly, time was getting away from them and Miss Wednesday was escorted helter-skelter across London, back to Paddington, to catch the train home by the skin of her teeth.  She has resolved that next time – because there will have to be a next time – she will stay a couple of nights in London to enable things to be taken at a less breakneck pace.  And then she can visit the markets, too…

 

 

People and Gardens Fashion Show Part 2

 Frocks, Wednesday March  Comments Off on People and Gardens Fashion Show Part 2
Nov 302014
 

Well, you were promised more pictures…

It’s always a bit of a gamble, using a bunch of friends as models rather than experienced professionals.  The first fashion show that Miss Wednesday did, proved that in no uncertain terms.  Some of the people asked, stepped up to the mark with alacrity and performed brilliantly, despite being stricken with terrible nerves and worrying themselves senseless about unnecessarily complicated choreography but a couple of others got plastered, messed around like over-excited teenagers and ruined a frock.  This time, two of the models actually choreographed the routine, one of whom was the most nervous last time and who would this time be leading the pack down the catwalk.  It proved an excellent strategy, because not only was the fabulous Miss Sara much more comfortable with the routine, she also ensured that despite the almost complete lack of rehearsal for everybody on the day (only Miss Sara and Mrs Alsop had actually done the routine before), everybody followed her lead and it went off almost without a hitch.  Certainly, one model got carried away with enthusiasm and took longer on the catwalk than her allotted phrase of music and the Stars of the Show took considerably longer than planned but they were doing such a wonderful job that it really didn’t matter, and Mrs A soon put things back on track.  It was just so obviously that they were all enjoying themselves so much and their enthusiasm certainly came through to the audience.

Ladies in 50s frocks

The Stars of the Show, Miss Julie and Miss Helen, flanked by Miss Tina and the Marvellous Mrs Alsop. Photo courtesy of People and Gardens CIC

The choice of music was, you must surely agree, inspired.  It had been causing Miss Wednesday a few headaches because she wanted something of an appropriate style for her frocks, ie swingy, but not too fast and definitely with a gardening – or at least floral – theme.  The best she could come up with was “In An English Country Garden”, which is pretty and not too fast and would have been memorable but just lacked the requisite swing.

Once again, Miss Sara took the bit between her teeth and ran with it, coming up with the perfect track.  Miss Wednesday had already considered the Floral Dance, but felt that the Terry Wogan version was just too ploddy.  Miss Sara said, “Ah yes, but the Matt Monro version is perfect.”  Seriously?  Matt Monro did the Floral Dance?!  Well, yes, it appears he did and he did it brilliantly.  It was the perfect track to use and, at 3 minutes and 20 seconds, about the right length.  Let’s face it, that’s a long time on a stage or catwalk and nobody wanted the audience to drop off or die of boredom.  And it would appear that nobody did.  The applause was thunderous, especially for the stars of the show, Miss Julie and Miss Helen.

Miss Wednesday did her very best to video the entire performance.  Unfortunately, despite her phone displaying the requisite symbols and red light to indicate that it was recording, it most certainly was not.  Hence the reliance on pictures from other sources for the blog posts…

Ladies on stage in 50s frocks

The full line up on the stage! Picture stolen from the Cornish Guardian.

 

Media coverage of the event was high and there’s a lovely article in the Cornish Guardian about it, complete with excellent pictures of both the Wednesday March girls and the other designers involved.  It’s slightly misleading in that it says that all the designers were from Plymouth College, which most certainly wasn’t the case, but the pictures are fabulous.  All in all, it was a wonderful event and one that raised over £5,000 for People and Gardens, which is not to be sneezed at.  Maybe they’ll consider doing it again next year…?

Nov 092014
 

Last week’s blog post proved a tad controversial in some quarters and an eye-opener in others.  I wanted to get people thinking and it seems – certainly from the stats on my various social media accounts – that I’ve achieved that.  But following on from my whinge about the swamping of the market to the detriment of the smaller (and more ethical) businesses, here’s the next part of the problem.  Read, digest, discuss.  I like a good debate.

I whinged at length about the flooding of the ‘big cheapo brands’ drowning and washing away the smaller ones.  Why is it such a problem?  Surely, if the smaller brands can’t compete – and much of life is about survival of the fittest – then it’s their own fault, isn’t it?  Well, no.  Not when the playing field is so uneven and the public so reluctant to open their eyes and see what is actually happening.

I’m all in favour of choice.  If we all wore the same thing, life would become incredibly bland.  I love life’s rich tapestry and I’m all for plenty of choices in the marketplace.  The more the merrier in my book!  I’ve never wanted to look like anyone else (except, perhaps, Isabella Rossellini, but even then not in her clothing choices).  Individualism is a good thing in my book.

But the World Domination Plan of the big cheapo brands actually ruin that.  Way back when, in the “good old days”, most basic staples were – relatively – more expensive than they are now, making people have to think more about how they spent their money.  They had a finite amount of money (credit was rare and credit cards hadn’t been invented) and had to really budget and consider – crucially – just how long a purchased item would last and whether it was worth the money.  People expected to pay a fair price for a fair product.   The throwaway society hadn’t been invented.  I wonder what my Great Aunt Gladys would think of life now?  She was a tailoress and made most of my family’s clothes.  My brother had properly tailored long trousers to wear to school in the winter (we’re talking late 50s and early 60s, when many young schoolboys had to put up with short trousers all year round) and Aunt Gladys taught my mother to recognise quality fabric, good construction and finish and garments that would last, even if they were a little more expensive.  My mother, in turn, used to flip up garments in shops when we went shopping and a sharp intake of breath would ensue if seams, hems or finishing weren’t up to scratch.   If you could afford better quality, then you bought it because it offered better value.  Clothes were worn time and time again and expected, with the right care, to last.  In order to “ring the changes”, people became inventive and wore them in different ways, with different things and added accessories.  This creativity seems to have all but disappeared and now people just want new clothing all the time and equate cheapness with value.  This is a fundamental flaw in reasoning.

Of course, not everybody can afford to pay £100 upwards for a frock.  I realise this.  I know plenty of people, however, who screech at the very idea of paying even £75 for a frock but those same people go out shopping every Saturday, coming back with bags full of clothes from the main emporia of tat.  I’m willing to wager a fair wedge that if you add up the cost of the garments in their bulging wardrobes, it would far outweigh the few items I buy each year.  I think it’s also a fair bet that (a) if you work out a ‘price per wear’ value for those garments, they are likely to be considerably more expensive than my treasured and well-worn stuff, (b) most of them will be much, much newer and (c) a high number will have never been worn at all.  I have garments in my cupboard that date back to the 1980s.  My classic Burberry mac, for instance, dates from circa 1983.  I’m not its first owner and probably won’t be its last as it is still going very strong and I have a list of people who want me to leave it to them in my Will.  I have a scarf/shawl I bought from Harrods for the exorbitant price of £12.50 back in December 1984.  The friend with me at the time was horrified.  I wonder what she’d say if I pointed out that I still have it and still wear it.  My favourite coat dates back to 1989 and still looks a million dollars when I wear it.  It was expensive but I have worn it and worn it and worn it and it will go on for many years yet.  Hell, it should see me out.  I might even be buried in it!  Well, if it isn’t spirited away by one of the people who have already “put their sticker on it”.

I also realise that many people see no reason to buy one quality frock when they can buy, say, 4 cheapo ones for the practically the same money.  Why buy one of mine, for example?  Well, because mine are individually made to order and tend to fit the purchaser, for a start.  I’ve seen a lot – and I mean a lot – of the cheapo frocks, that people bring in to me, asking if I can “make them fit”.  I’ve looked, I’ve been horrified and I’ve turned every single one away.  No.  I can’t sort them out because the cut and manufacture of the dresses isn’t up to scratch in the first place.  The reason they poke at the neck is because the neckline has just been turned over and, basically, hemmed.  There are no linings, no facings, no understitching; nothing to ensure the neckline works properly.  Looks lovely on a mannequin but doesn’t work on a real body.  At least, not when that body does something ridiculous like, er, move.  And the reason there’s something not quite right about the waistline is because the manufacturer has shifted one or more pattern pieces off the grain of the fabric in order to squeeze out more dresses.  Woven fabric is solid in two directions.  When you start cutting across those threads at an angle, the fabric starts to move and becomes stretchy.  This is fine when it has been deliberately cut on the bias as part of the design (much of the beautiful, slinky fit and draping of 1930s clothing is achieved this way) but when it’s not meant to do that, it becomes a problem.  How many tops – t-shirts especially – have you seen where the sleeves have twisted, especially after washing?  It’s because the manufacturer has skimped and cut the fabric where it shouldn’t have been cut instead of using a bit more fabric and doing it properly.  It’s “never mind the quality, feel the width” again.  Does it really  matter with a £2 t-shirt from Primark?  Well, yes.  It does.  You add up the price of all those rubbish t-shirts you’ve worn a couple of times and then had to ditch because they’re unwearable.  Maybe you could have bought one that was well-made in a quality fabric that you would still be wearing – and looking good in – several years down the line.

Of course, if you persist in buying only the cheapo stuff, you may not have that quality option in future.  Not unless you’re willing to shell out a lot more money and I do mean a lot.  At the moment, we have a middle ground with excellent options  – check out Miss Fortune and Lady K Loves  for starters – in between the exploitative cheap stuff and the expensive brands.  But if the cheapo brands win out, the middle ground will simply disappear so there will be no real option for buying quality unless you can shell out a vast amount of money and your chances of purchasing anything other than mainstream fast fashion will be virtually nil.  Not everybody wants to look the same but at some point they may have little choice and that would be disastrous for both the alternative scene (which encompasses more than just vintage/retro) and the planet, as resources are plundered with no regard to economies, the environment and the lives of the people being paid so little to produce sub-standard rubbish to satisfy the first world thirst for more.

Please don’t let that happen.

Nov 022014
 

Last week, I read a status from a friend on Facebook that really struck a chord with me:-

“So hard when my business is struggling and I keep seeing my friends liking and sharing posts from one of the main cheapo, poor quality, overseas made brands that are putting me out of business.”

Ouch.  I feel that pain.  Because it’s happening a lot.  And I’m seeing it from people I thought actually cared about the same things I care about.  About supporting British business and industry.  About buying the best quality they can afford and thinking about their purchases rather than, “Never mind the quality, feel the width”.

It actually makes me feel sick* when I see someone I consider a close friend helping advertise these fly-by-night companies, who mostly import cheap copies from China and have them labelled as their own designs.  I think about the friends and contacts I have in the fashion industry who have worked hard to build up their retro brands and doggedly stuck to their principles – having everything done in the UK and doing their bit to support British manufacturing, even though it undoubtedly costs more – also feeling sick as they watch their friends and customers marketing this stuff for those companies who don’t give a hoot about ethics, supporting this country’s economy or even about the customers who adore the retro/vintage/rockabilly/psychobilly look and scene.  What will these “brands” be doing when the whim of fashion turns to something “new”?  Where will those people who are longtime devotees of the look get their clothing then?  Because I can assure you that those big, cheapo brands are bandwagon jumpers and they will drop the current look for the next big thing quicker than a yummy mummy with the whiff of a new “designer” fragrance.  They haven’t worked long hours perfecting their craft, their designs and their skills.  They haven’t searched and researched in order to bring you quality products manufactured with integrity.  They copied the ideas of those designers who put in the hours and work, handed them over to sweatshops in far flung lands, no doubt squeezed the margins on those factories and are now flooding the market with “their” products.

Woman in retro frock at desk and frowning

Miss Wednesday sweating blood in her workshop. Doing the stuff that isn’t sewing. Yes, she’s grumpy.

I’ve noticed a huge change in the pages of Vintage Life magazine since some of these “brands” started swamping the marketplace.  The pages are now filled with “look books” from the likes of them and most of the smaller advertisers have disappeared.  Where have they gone?  I shudder to think.  There used to be at least 8 pages of “classified” adverts for smaller British brands.  Now there are 2.  And while we’re on the subject of advertising, you know all those features with pretty products from different companies?  Little pictures of delicious items that the magazine have been clever enough to track down and want to share with their lovely readership?  Doesn’t work like that.  In order to have your product included in one of those “What we’re loving this month!” features, you are expected to pay a lot of money.  It doesn’t look like paid for advertising but I can assure you that it is.  And it’s expensive.  Most of the smaller companies can’t afford it, which is why you see the same few big names cropping up time and time again, including some from the US.

So there’s the irony.  Those big companies with their huge advertising budgets who are swamping the market, are also getting the “liker and sharers” to do their advertising for them.  Double whammy!  How they must rub their hands with glee.  “All we have to do is offer one of our cheap as chips products and thousands upon thousands of people are spreading the word for us!  It’s cost us, ooh, less than a tenner!  Result!”  And that’s if they do actually give away all the frocks they are offering…  There’s a lot of fakery goes on with Facebook.  Plenty of accounts aren’t actually real.  It’s a huge problem.

The boutiques are also hit by the swamping tactics.  As the market becomes flooded with these wares, the smaller, middle-ground companies get pushed out and people expect to buy a frock for £24.99 so the boutiques have little choice but to stock those products instead.  Obviously they need to shift a lot of those products in order to pay the rent and overheads on their premises, let alone make a living but if that’s what the customer demands…  Of course, it isn’t long before the boutiques are forced to give up and close their doors.  This is happening all over the country, which is taking away jobs and livelihoods and removing choice from the consumer.

So please, think about what you buy and think about what you’re “liking and sharing” on social media too.  Consider the wider implications of your actions because those ripples go a long way and their consequences may well not be to your liking.

Next week, the importance of that choice.  And coming soon there will be a links page entitled “Miss Wednesday Loves…”  It will be chock-a-block with loveliness of excellent quality and wonderful design and, frankly, spilling over with integrity, although not in a “flappy sandals and knit-your-own-yoghurt” way.  Your go-to resource for all the things that – gasp! – Miss Wednesday cannot provide.  Watch this space.

 

* It should be pointed out, however, that whilst it is a horrid feeling, it’s tempered by the knowledge that none of the people I consider friends will have done this maliciously and therefore it’s never made a blind bit of difference to my feelings towards them and their friendship.

 

“Will You Be My Bridesmaid?”

 Frocks, Style, Weddings  Comments Off on “Will You Be My Bridesmaid?”
Oct 122014
 

Also known as “Fifteen years of friendship down the drain…”

The bridesmaid thing.  Is it a blessing or a curse?  An opportunity to have a wonderful, friendship-sealing rite of passage with your closest friends/nearest and dearest or The Sweetest Revenge Opportunity Ever?

I get a lot of enquiries about bridesmaids’ dresses.  A lot.  Oh yes.  Most come from the bride to be and/or her mother.  Mostly they are nice and want something pretty but slightly unusual and ‘vintage-style’.  Something that isn’t prom/evening wear or in satin/chiffon/organza.   Mostly I am able to oblige them with exactly what they are wanting, even if they haven’t been able to quite put it into words.  Sometimes there is no way on this earth I am going to be able to work with either the bride or the mother and nothing I can do will actually make them happy.  That’s when my order book becomes over-full and fabric unavailable…   But usually I can help.

The thing with bridesmaids is that they come in all shapes, sizes, ages and outlooks.  It is an absolute minefield for the kind and caring bride to try to negotiate the terrain and keep each and every one of her attendants happy in a frock that will fit, suit, match the theme/colour scheme and not scare the vicar.  Enough to put you off getting married anywhere other than in secret with a couple of witnesses grabbed off the street.  (Regular readers will know that I had the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse as attendants at my wedding.  Much easier and more fun.  And no, not a euphemism for various family members I detest, either!)

Of course, the majority of wedding consultations start out in a less than happy mood.  When there is more than one bridesmaid, they are invariably all worried about what is going to happen, what the others may want or not want and what they are likely to end up with.  They don’t want to upset the other bridesmaids and they certainly don’t want to upset the bride.  If I had a pound for every time I heard, “I’m just going to turn up and wear whatever you want me to wear,” uttered with a sigh, then I’d be smiling all the way to the bank.  Unfortunately, nobody ever coughs up that pound, nor does that sentence fill me – or the bride – with joy.  On the contrary, it’s when the feeling of Impending Doom deepens, blackens and threatens the swallow up the room and everyone in it.  Weddings should be joyful occasions and nobody wants a bridesmaid who is really unhappy with her frock or is there on sufferance.  Every female member of that wedding party should be wearing something that makes her want to dance.  Which is where I come in…

Happily, most of the people who come to see me about bridal stuff want “something different”; it’s quite rare for me to be confronted with “everything is to be traditional and done by the book”, which is probably my worst nightmare.  Weddings should be fun.  Have I said that already?  I’ll repeat it anyway.  Weddings should be fun.  And the participants should be comfortable.  To that end, I have a few styles that I know work very well for bridesmaid dresses.  The Leah and Diana styles (halter neck or cap sleeved, princess seamed, straight or sweetheart neckline) are the most obvious choices and very popular, especially as the bodices are shirred at the back, delivering excellent fit and the potential for devouring an extra slice of wedding cake in comfort.  Not everybody wants a halter neck, so the Diana gives a little more shoulder coverage.

Halterneck retro 50s style full skirted frock in yellow fabric with printed cherry pattern

Leah halter neck style, in yellow cherry print fabric.

 

Retro 50s style frock with cap sleeves in black fabric with bright pink roses

Diana full skirted style, with straight neckline (can also be done with sweetheart) and cap sleeves.

But then, there are always ladies who worry – probably more than they should – about their arms.  And tummies.  Hips.  Shoulders.  Oh, every bit of them.  At this point, I usually recommend a burkha.  When they’re over the shock of that and realise I’m joking, I point them in the direction of Verity, my pseudo-1940s style with the slight empire line and the full circle skirt.

Yesterday’s clients were a hoot.  Lovely ladies but not at all happy about the prospect of finding the perfect style to suit them all.  The dress they all – allegedly – wanted wasn’t going to work, as another dressmaker had already told them.  They said they “liked the style” of Diana but their faces clearly said, “Not that much…”  Sleeves were mentioned.   I waved to Verity and they all assumed an expression of horror.  Now, I know that poor Verity wasn’t on the best mannequin (Gladys, my lingerie model, who is difficult at the best of times, and is the mannequin on the right hand side in the following picture) and wasn’t sporting a petticoat, so probably didn’t look her most enticing.  But the reaction was hysterical.  “Oh, I don’t like that at all!” came from the bride.  Quickly followed by, “It makes me think of 1940s…”  Yes!  It’s supposed to!  “… Those things that cleaners wore.  Crossed over at the front.  Hideous.  Sorry.  I really don’t like it.”  Cracking description, albeit not how I see the frock.  Chief Bridesmaid was more succinct.  “Looks like a preg tent.”

Retro style frock in navy spot fabric with sleeves and crossover bodice

Verity in navy pin spot fabric.

At this point I did my best not to double up on the floor laughing.  I have never heard the expression “preg tent” before but I am certainly storing that one up for future usage.  Oh yes.

I’m not sure how Chief Bridesmaid was persuaded to don said “preg tent” but she was.  Petticoat was slipped over her head (she wasn’t going through the rigmarole of getting her kit off to try a cleaner’s overall!) and Verity followed.  Zipped up the back.  Expression changed.  She looked in the mirror and realised she looked fabulous.  She twirled.  She smiled.  Twirled a bit more and beamed. Everybody else beamed.  The bride was gobsmacked and changed her mind completely about the style.  All of a sudden, it ticked all the boxes.   The other bridesmaids did their best to try it on (wrong size, not their fault) and pronounced themselves equally enamoured.  And they all smiled.

Now all I have to do is source the perfect fabrics, because they’re all having the same design but different colours.  Very precise different colours.  Did they come armed with knowledge of the exact Pantones?  No.  Of course not.  (And, frankly, the day a bridal party does that is the day I run away screaming!)  But they are off to B&Q to arm themselves with those paint colour cards.  Easy.

Me?  I’m off fabric shopping, which I enjoy.  I’ll be looking for specifics when I rock up at the London Textile Fair in January, not just inspiration.  Excellent.

Meanwhile, the bridal party have the fun of deciding what colour petticoats (I’m recommending a pop of something vivid underneath their pastel frocks) and finding The Perfect Shoes.  The right style, colour and ones they can walk and dance in.  All day and night.

Now that we’ve settled on the style, I think I have the easier task…